Ohsweken Speedway

Discover the thrills of racing on the Ohsweken Speedway, a ⅜ mile dirt track in the village of Ohsweken in Ontario. It is popular for its weekly Friday night racing programs that run yearly from May to September, as well as hosting weekly Micro Sprint racing on Thursday nights. 

Ohsweken Speedway is approximately 100 km southwest from Toronto.

For up-to-date information about Ohsweken Speedway and its racing schedules, be sure to check out their official website. To discover fun things to do and places to explore nearby, keep reading to see what Destination Ontario recommends. 

Some things to do may not be available due to COVID-19.

Many tourism experiences require advance bookings or have restrictions in place due to COVID 19. It is important to check directly with the business operator before you travel. Get the most up-to-date information now.

More about Ohsweken Speedway

Ohsweken Speedway was built in 1994 by Glenn Styres, a local race car driver. Starting out on 32 hectares of the Styres family-owned land, Ohsweken Speedway has been continually expanding every year. In 2008, the speedway’s seating capacity was increased to accommodate over 8,000 people, in preparation for the World of Outlaws Sprint Car Series, which they hosted from 2007 to 2017. 

Ohsweken Speedway is a go-to for locals and visitors alike, whether they are racing enthusiasts or new to the sport altogether. Spectators are rewarded with spectacular fireworks displays whenever racing winners cross into the victory lane, and tasty snacks are easily available, as well as bathrooms and a souvenir shop. We recommend you bring earplugs and goggles as it can get quite loud and dusty, which adds to the excitement.

Ohsweken Speedway also sits within the Six Nations of the Grand River First Nation Indian Reserve, which means visitors can extend their Ohsweken trip and learn about local Indigenous history and culture as well. History buffs can walk through Veterans' Park, which commemorates 200 Indigenous soldiers who bravely served in the Second World War, or visit the Chiefswood National Historic Site. Formerly the childhood home of esteemed poetess E. Pauline Johnson, this villa nestled within the Carolinian Forest honours the role of its owners as intermediaries between Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures. 

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